Iraq and the War of Sanctions: Conventional Threats and Weapons of Mass Destruction

By Anthony H. Cordesman | Go to book overview

Preface

The military analysis in this book describes three main themes: Iraq’s efforts to rebuild its conventional forces following the Gulf War, the history of its efforts to proliferate, and its long struggle to block UN efforts to deprive it of weapons of mass destruction. It is the history and character of each of these efforts which this book calls the ‘‘war of sanctions.’’ The description of Iraq’s conventional forces and efforts to proliferate was updated in January, 1999, shortly after Operation Desert Fox. It reflects a remarkable degree of continuity over a nearly ten-year-long period, and suggests that most elements of Iraq’s force structure are unlikely to change until there is another major war or Saddam Hussein loses power.

Just as this book was completed, however, the war of sanctions took on a different character. Beginning in July, 1997, Iraq intensified its struggle to end UN sanctions and to block the UN Special Commission (UNSCOM) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections that sought to halt its efforts to proliferate. As this book describes in detail, these Iraqui actions brought the United States and Britain to the edge of military action in late 1997, in February, 1998, and in the fall of 1998. Nevertheless, in early November, 1998, it still seemed that UNSCOM and the IAEA might be able to continue their operations in Iraq, maintaining many of the elements of an effective inspection and monitoring regime.

As late as November 14, 1998, Iraq’s Deputy Prime Minister, Tariq Aziz, sent a letter to UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan stating that the Iraqi leadership had ‘‘decided to resume working with the Special Commission and the IAEA and to allow them to perform their normal duties...not out of fear of the aggressive American campaign and the threat to commit a new aggression against Iraq, but as an expression of our feeling of responsibility and in response

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Iraq and the War of Sanctions: Conventional Threats and Weapons of Mass Destruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 684

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.