Iraq and the War of Sanctions: Conventional Threats and Weapons of Mass Destruction

By Anthony H. Cordesman | Go to book overview

Chapter 20

The Policy Implications of Iraq’s Weapons of Mass Destruction

The most important single conclusion of the preceding analysis is that Iraq’s ‘‘war of sanctions’’—and its continuing efforts to proliferate—create a continuing problem that the UN can limit while sanctions are still in force but cannot hope to end. Iraq will continue to attempt to proliferate as long as Saddam Hussein or any similar leader is in charge. Its efforts will also be far reaching and opportunistic. Iraq’s weapons developments, force plans, strategy, doctrine, and war plans are far more likely to be driven by its ability to create new opportunities rather than by any combination of ideology, long-term plans or strategy, or a coherent focus on one path to proliferation in exclusion of another.

The Iraqi leadership can be counted on to block inspections as long as it can and to create new barriers at every opportunity. It can be counted on to continue to exploit ‘‘sanctions fatigue’’ in any way it can. It will exploit the suffering of the Iraqi people to try to make the world ignore the risks of Iraqi rearmament and proliferation. It will exploit divisions within the UN Security Council, and every weakness in the UN inspection and export control effort. It will treat proliferation as Iraq’s second-most important strategic priority, ranking only after the survival of the leadership itself. It will seek to undermine and put a final end to the inspection phase of the IAEA and UNSCOM effort, and to either ensure that there is no monitoring phase or that it is rigid and symbolic and is not backed by inspections and the expansion of monitoring to cover new facilities. As the events of October, 1997–October, 1998 show, it may well be willing to lose some equipment to US and British air and missile strikes if it believes this is the price of making the IAEA and UNSCOM ineffective. Similarly, the Iraqi leadership may well be willing to sacrifice substantial amounts of Iraq’s con-

-643-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Iraq and the War of Sanctions: Conventional Threats and Weapons of Mass Destruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 684

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.