Nazi-Deutsch/Nazi-German: An English Lexicon of the Language of the Third Reich

By Robert Michael; Karin Doerr | Go to book overview

Foreword

Wolfgang Mieder

The literature on Nazi Germany and the Holocaust is vast and continues to grow as scholars probe ever deeper into this dark period of modern history. Every study represents an addition to the composite picture of this totalitarian state with its policies of mass destruction. By now, much is known about the rise to power of the National Socialists, Adolf Hitler and his criminal inner circle, the path to World War II, the antisemitic propaganda, and the horrific event of the Holocaust. The annihilation of millions of people has also been documented in shocking detail; and much insight has been gained into the role of the perpetrators of these crimes against humanity, the inhumane nonaction against these murderous deeds by the so-called bystanders, and the suffering and merciless killings of innocent victims. In addition to scholarly investigations, there are also invaluable eyewitness accounts in the form of simple personal narratives, of which some have been published as major autobiographies of survivors that have touched the minds and hearts of readers wanting to understand what happened during these modern dark ages.

And yet, one element that surely was of considerable importance in bringing Nazi Germany and the Holocaust about is absent in most of these valuable accounts. This missing link is the use and misuse of the Germany language during this incomprehensible period in Germany history. It must not be forgotten that the chauvinistic escalation toward total war, the absurd racial theories, the antisemitic propaganda, and the meticulously organized and executed destruction of European Jews and other groups of victims could not have succeeded without the communicative power of language. There can and must be no doubt that the devilish and propagandistic misuse and perversion of the German language played a significant role in changing Germany from a democratic and decent nation to one of terror, persecution, and death. In order for the war and mass killings to occur, people needed to be linguistically manipulated to communicate the ill-conceived

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Nazi-Deutsch/Nazi-German: An English Lexicon of the Language of the Third Reich
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Notes xiv
  • Foreword xv
  • Preface xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • The Tradition of Anti-Jewish Language 1
  • Nazi-Deutsch: An Ideological Language of Exclusion, Domination, and Annihilation 27
  • Lexicon 47
  • A 49
  • B 86
  • C 112
  • D 115
  • E 135
  • F 156
  • G 175
  • H 200
  • I 216
  • J 221
  • K 233
  • L 254
  • M 269
  • N 283
  • O 299
  • P 309
  • Q 321
  • R 322
  • S 356
  • T 394
  • U 403
  • V 411
  • W 430
  • X 448
  • Z 449
  • Appendix 459
  • Select Bibliography 477
  • About the Authors 481
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