Nazi-Deutsch/Nazi-German: An English Lexicon of the Language of the Third Reich

By Robert Michael; Karin Doerr | Go to book overview

F

F. Abbreviation for Franzose (Frenchman) on French prisoners’ triangles. See also Dreieckswinkel.

Fabrikaktion. Operation Factory. SS seizure of Jewish men working in Berlin factories in February 1943. Their Aryan wives and German-Jewish children, numbering about 6,000 people, successfully protested their arrest. See also Rosenstraße.

Fabrik-Medizin. Factory medicine. Derogatory for Jewish medical practices.

Fachkräfte. Special Task Forces. Units of the Technical Emergency Help and Todt Organization. See also Organisation Todt; Technische Nothilfe.

Fachschaft. Specialty organization. Group of all students studying the same subject, meeting twice a week for ideological and physical training.

FAD.See Freiwilliger Arbeitsdienst.

Fahndung Funk. (F. Fu.) Radio Search. Branch of Military Intelligence that located forbidden radio transmitters in France.

“(die) Fahne hoch!” “Raise the flag high.” See also “Horst-Wessel-Lied.”

“(die) Fahne ist mehr als der Tod.” “The flag is more than death.” Line from the Hitler Youth anthem.

Fahneneid. Flag oath. The oath of allegiance to Hitler sworn by the German armed forces. See also Appendix: Treueid.

Fahnenheid.See Fahneneid.

Fahnenweihe. Consecration of the flag. Annul ritual during which Hitler consecrated the new Party flags by touching them with the blood flag. See also Blutfahne.

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Nazi-Deutsch/Nazi-German: An English Lexicon of the Language of the Third Reich
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Notes xiv
  • Foreword xv
  • Preface xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • The Tradition of Anti-Jewish Language 1
  • Nazi-Deutsch: An Ideological Language of Exclusion, Domination, and Annihilation 27
  • Lexicon 47
  • A 49
  • B 86
  • C 112
  • D 115
  • E 135
  • F 156
  • G 175
  • H 200
  • I 216
  • J 221
  • K 233
  • L 254
  • M 269
  • N 283
  • O 299
  • P 309
  • Q 321
  • R 322
  • S 356
  • T 394
  • U 403
  • V 411
  • W 430
  • X 448
  • Z 449
  • Appendix 459
  • Select Bibliography 477
  • About the Authors 481
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