Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
The Splendid Little War. Kearny, NJ: Belle Grove Publishing Co., 1992. Videocassette. 55-minute documentary including recently recovered film documenting the war as the first conflict captured in moving images.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Spanish-American War Centennial Website. http://www.powerscourt.com/war/index.htm Currently under construction. Offers a chronology of the war and eventually will include background material, action reports, profiles, and other material.
2.

Philippine Insurrection (1899–1902)
The United States acquired the Philippine Islands as a result of the Spanish-American War, despite demands for independence by Filipino nationalists, who had fought against Spanish rule. Led by Emilio Aguinaldo, insurgent forces clashed with U.S. troops as soon as word reached the islands of the terms of the peace treaty. Even before that treaty was ratified by the U.S. Senate by a close vote, America found itself at war again. The war deeply divided Americans at home. The U.S. military captured Aguinaldo in 1901, but the insurrection lasted until mid-1902. More than 4,000 American troops and possibly as many as 20,000 insurgents died; the death toll among civilians, largely from disease, was much higher. William Howard Taft’s patient and compassionate work as governor of the Philippines did much to pacify the situation, and American missionaries made a significant contribution to public health and education in the islands in the forty years of U.S. occupation. Still, the moral legacy of the war remained vexatious. Not until the 1930s, however, was any plan put into effect to give Filipinos self-government; the Philippine Republic was granted independence in 1946. This occasion closed a troubled chapter in American foreign policy.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Compare contemporary arguments for and against the annexation of the Philippines.

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