Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
opposing views in 60-minute presentation from The American Experience series.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Library of Congress. ‘‘The Evolution of the Conservation Movement, 1850–1920.’’ American Memory. April 1997. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/amrvhtml/conshome.html Extraordinary source materials: photographs, hard-to-find printed works, and manuscripts. Exceptional year-by-year chronology.
9.

Establishment of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (1909)
By the early 1900s African Americans in the South suffered from disenfranchisement, segregation, and widespread physical violence that included lynchings. Conditions in the North were not as appalling, yet usually brought second-class citizenship. On the centennial of Lincoln’s birthday, February 12, 1909, a biracial group including W. E. B. Du Bois, John Dewey, Jane Addams, and Oswald Garrison Villard organized the NAACP to oppose segregation, promote equal educational opportunities, and fight for the enforcement of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments. Du Bois was named an officer and editor of the organization’s journal, The Crisis.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Why did racial segregation (Jim Crow laws) become the law in the South?
2. Compare the views of Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois on how African Americans should deal with their problems.
3. Why was the NAACP established? What were its goals?
4. How does today’s NAACP differ from the original organization?
5. Analyze Du Bois’s changing views on racial problems in the United States.

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