Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES
One Woman, One Vote. Santa Monica, CA: PBS Home Video, 1995. Videocassette. 60 minutes. From PBS’s The American Experience series. There is a companion volume (with the same title), published by New Sage Press, 1995, providing an excellent collection of essays on various aspects of the movement for women’s vote and women’s rights.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Library of Congress. ‘‘Votes for Women—Selections from the National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection, 1848–1921.’’ American Memory. July 1996. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawshome.html An extraordinary opportunity to use primary sources. National Women’s History Project. Women Win the Vote. August 1995. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawshome.html Excellent site commemorating the seventy-fifth anniversary of woman suffrage. Links to collective biography of seventy-five suffragists, important dates, and brief history.
13.

Progressive Reforms Enacted
Progressive era legislators enacted a host of political, economic, and social reforms at the city, state, and national levels of government. The agenda of reform politics included breaking the powers of political machines and extending the democratic process through women’s suffrage, the direct election of senators, and the initiative, referendum, and recall. Economic reforms centered on regulating big business and banking practices. Protecting women and children workers was also an important issue for reformers. Perhaps no other social reform engendered as much controversy as did the battle to enact prohibition.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Who was the more important presidential reformer, Theodore Roosevelt or Woodrow Wilson?

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