Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
ography of female social reformers and social scientists during the period.
AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES
The Progressive Movement. Wynewood, PA: Schlessinger/Library Video, 1996. Videocassette. 40-minute presentation on the roots of progressivism. Volume 14 of the 20-volume set, United States History Video Collection.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Schultz, Stanley K. American History 102—Civil War to the Present. (1998). http://hum.lss.wisc.edu/hist102/index.html University of Wisconsin course provides excellent narrative and relevant pictures. Click on ‘‘Student Web Notes’’ and see lectures 11 and 12 treating progressivism and morality of power with Roosevelt and Wilson.
14.

Woodrow Wilson and the Mexican Crisis (1913–1917)
Events in revolutionary Mexico tested President Wilson’s policy of ‘‘missionary diplomacy,’’ which tried to infuse morality and idealism into foreign relations. When Mexican general Victoriano Huerta established a military dictatorship in 1913, Wilson refused to extend diplomatic recognition and supported the general’s rival, Venustiano Carranza. In April 1914, Mexican authorities briefly arrested some American sailors in Tampico and shortly thereafter U.S. forces seized Veracruz. Perhaps only the mediation of the ABC Powers (Argentina, Brazil, and Chile) prevented war. The United States recognized the new Carranza government in 1915. The bandit Pancho Villa created grave concern by killing Americans in Mexico and in New Mexico. Wilson sent General John J. Pershing into Mexico in an unsuccessful attempt to capture Villa.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Compare Wilson’s ‘‘missionary diplomacy’’ with Taft’s ‘‘dollar diplomacy.’’

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