Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

Simpson, Colin. Lusitania. (1972). Reprint. New York: Penguin Books, 1983. A standard history with a good bibliography.


BIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES

Ashby, LeRoy. William Jennings Bryan: Champion of Democracy. Boston: Twayne, 1987. Provides insight into Bryan’s growing disenchantment with Wilson’s anti-German policies and his resignation over the Lusitania notes. Helpful bibliography.

Link, Arthur S. Woodrow Wilson and a Revolutionary World, 1913–1921. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1982. Focuses on Wilson and European affairs.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

The Lusitania. Orland Park, IL: MPI Home Video, 1989. Videocassette. 30 minutes. Part of the Secrets of the Unknown series. Host Edward Mulhare presents the intriguing story .


WORLD WIDE WEB

‘‘Interviews—Winter: The Lusitania.’’ The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century. September 1997. http://www3.pbs.org/greatwar/ A multimedia project produced by PBS in association with the Imperial War Museum of London. Contains many pictures, a chronology, and interviews with historians. Click on the interview with Jay M. Winter, who briefly describes the conditions leading to the Lusitania incident.


17.

The United States and World War I (1917–1918)

Citing Germany’s repeated violations of America’s rights as a neutral and vowing that the world ‘‘must be made safe for democracy,’’ Woodrow Wilson asked Congress for a declaration of war on April 2, 1917. Congress, despite some opposition, assented. Nearly 5 million Americans enlisted or were drafted, and more than 50,000 died in battle before the fighting stopped. Mobilizing for war, the government created new regulatory agencies, and women and numerous

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