Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
Woodrow Wilson: Peace and War and the Professor President. Chatsworth, CA: AIMS Multimedia, 1984. The career and achievements of the president, in a 23-minute narration by E. G. Marshall.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Schoenherr, Steve. The Versailles Treaty—June 28, 1919. November 1995; updated February 1997. http://ac.acusd.edu/History/text/versaillestreaty/vercontents.htm/ Contains complete treaty with access by sections; also provides cartoons, maps, and links to other relevant sites.
19.

The Red Scare (1919–1920)
Fear of radicalism swept across the nation after World War I, largely as the result of the Bolshevik triumph in Russia and the threat of its spread. This fear heightened existing domestic tensions. In 1919, more than 4,000 labor strikes occurred, including a Seattle general strike and a Boston policemen’s strike. Bombs were mailed to prominent figures, and an explosion killed thirty-eight persons on Wall Street. Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer, whose front porch was bombed, moved to suppress radicalism, arresting 6,000 suspected radicals and ultimately having 556 deported. The Red Scare subsided in mid-1920 after a purported mass uprising of radicals failed to materialize.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. How real was the threat of bolshevism to the United States?
2. Were the Boston police justified in striking?
3. Analyze the effect of the Red Scare on American civil liberties.
4. Discuss the long-range consequences of the Red Scare.
5. Should the radicals have been deported?

Suggested Sources: See entries 21 and 58 for related items.

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