Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

WORLD WIDE WEB
MacLaury, Judson. ‘‘History of DOL, 1913–1988.’’ 1988. U.S. Department of Labor. http://www.dol.gov/dol/asp/public/programs/history/hs75menu.htm Short recognition of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the department. The first chapter covers the first eight years and briefly treats the Red Scare as one of the major problems following the war.
20.

Prohibition (1919–1933)
Ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment in January 1919 and the subsequent passage of the Volstead Act in October brought prohibition to the United States, polarizing ‘‘wets’’ and ‘‘drys,’’ and proving enormously difficult to enforce. Despite the legendary efforts of dedicated agents such as Eliot Ness, illegal speakeasies flourished, as did organized crime, which reaped great profits. Al Capone was but one, if the most famous, of the many gangsters of the era. The Wickersham Report of 1931 noted the failures of prohibition but advocated its continuation, which President Herbert Hoover called an ‘‘experiment, noble in motive and far-reaching in purpose.’’ Nonetheless, the Twenty-first Amendment, ratified in December 1933, repealed prohibition.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Why did the United States adopt prohibition?
2. Analyze why prohibition failed.
3. Discuss the career of a prominent prohibition era gangster.
4. What were the long-range consequences of prohibition?
5. Compare prohibition with today’s attempts to ban addictive drugs.

Suggested Sources: See entry 32 for related items.

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