Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
and interesting web site maintained by the Ohio State University History Department. Table of contents is presented with the music from Cheers and leads to fine narratives and pictorials such as, ‘‘Why was there Prohibition in the United States?’’ and ‘‘American Prohibition in the 1920s.’’
21.

Sacco–Vanzetti Trial (1921)
Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, Italian-born anarchists, were arrested in May 1920 on charges that they had committed robbery and murder in Braintree, Massachusetts. Their subsequent trial, set in the midst of the Red Scare, was marked by ambiguous evidence and prejudice on the part of the presiding judge, Webster Thayer. Found guilty, the defendants received death sentences. A special commission of three (Lowell Commission) reviewed and upheld the verdict. Sacco and Vanzetti were executed in August 1927 despite widespread international protest. Many believed that their radical politics and unpopular ethnicity had condemned the two. In 1968 the governor of Massachusetts issued a proclamation that acknowledged the trial’s lack of fairness.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Discuss the differing views on whether Sacco and/or Vanzetti was guilty.
2. Analyze Judge Thayer’s conduct during the trial.
3. How important were the defendants’ ethnic background and political views in determining their fates?
4. Discuss the public protest against the verdict and the execution of Sacco and Vanzetti.
5. Compare the real case with a depiction, such as Upton Sinclair’s novel Boston (1928), or the movie Sacco and Vanzetti (1971).

Suggested Sources: See entry 19 for related items.


REFERENCE SOURCES

Encyclopedia of the American Judicial System: Studies of the Principal Institutions and Processes of Law. Robert Janosik, ed. New York: Scribner,

-60-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 311

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.