Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
lished by the University of Michigan. Describes Ford’s appeal in rural regions.
AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES
The Story of Henry Ford. Chicago: Questar Video, 1991. Videocassette. 55minute presentation in black and white with original footage, along with commentary and interviews. Part of an eleven-volume series, Famous Americans of the 20th Century.
WORLD WIDE WEB
The Model T. 1997. http://www.fordlincmerc.com/vford932.html Provides a brief history from 1908 to 1927, as well as a picture of Ford with his auto. Useful examples of advertising and product literature, along with specifications and more photographs. Maintained by a Ford dealership in California.
23.

Revival of the Ku Klux Klan
Influenced by D. W. Griffith’s movie, The Birth of a Nation, William J. Simmons, a salesman and fraternal organizer, founded the twentieth-century KKK in 1915. Initially small, its membership reached 4.5 million by the mid-1920s. The chief reason for this popularity was its appeal to widespread anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic, anti-Jewish, anti–African American, and anti-wet sentiment. Its influence on political life was most significant at the state and local levels, but the Klan also was able to block the presidential nomination of Democrat Alfred E. Smith in 1924. A major scandal involving an Indiana Klan leader, David Stephenson, who was convicted of second-degree murder, and the efforts of anti-Klan groups led to the organization’s decline by the end of the 1920s.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Compare the early twentieth-century KKK with the original Klan of the Reconstruction era.
2. Discuss why the Klan became powerful during the 1920s.
3. Discuss the opposition to the Klan.

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