Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

Reprint. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. Well-researched description of the Klan in the twentieth century. Provides insight into the movement for white supremacy in the United States.


BIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES

Lutholtz, M. William. Grand Dragon: D. C. Stephenson and the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 1991. Examination of Stephenson’s life and career as the ranking Klan official in Indiana; examines his violations, including murder.

McIlhany, William H. Klandestine: The Untold Story of Delmar Dennis and His Role in the FBI’s War against the Ku Klux Klan. New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House, 1975. Interesting story of an agent’s efforts to bring the Klan to justice.

Rowe, Gary T., Jr. My Undercover Years with the Ku Klux Klan. New York: Bantam Books, 1976. An interesting account of spy operations in Alabama.

Tarrants, Thomas A. The Conversion of a Klansman: The Story of a Former Ku Klux Klan Terrorist. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1979. Interesting biography of a former member who shifted his allegiance away from the Klan.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

The Klan: A Legacy of Hate in America. Chicago: Films Inc. Video, 1982. Videocassette. 30-minute presentation of the current status of the Klan in the United States.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Cook, Carson C. A Hundred Years of Terror. 1996; updated March 1997. http://osprey.unf.edu/dept/equalop/oeop11.htm Detailed and thorough analytical report by the Southern Poverty Law Center of the origin, decline, and revival of the Klan.


24.

First Radio Broadcasts

The first major radio broadcast took place in November 1920 when Westinghouse-owned station KDKA in Pittsburgh aired the presidential election results. Commercial programming began soon after and

-68-

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