Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

WORLD WIDE WEB
Library of Congress. Early Motion Pictures 1897–1916. http://lcweb2.loc.gov/papr/mpixhome.html Great combination of graphics and narrative of historical interest not usually found in books; excellent links to little-known sites for film study. Passi, Federico. ‘‘Cinema History: Silent Films.’’ The Cinema Connection. 1995; updated continuously. http://www.socialchange.net.au/TCC/CinemaHistory/SilentFilms/index.html Many links to relevant sites and pages (Bow, Fields, Chaplin, Gish, Keaton, Lloyd, etc.).
26.

Harlem Renaissance
World War I witnessed a significant migration of African Americans from the fields of the South to the factories of the North. Many settled in Harlem, which quickly became the mecca for African American writers and artists. Notable among the writers were Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and Alain Locke, who drew on their largely neglected African American heritage. Harlem also became home to a rich jazz culture during the 1920s. Denying that African Americans or their culture could ever find a home in the United States, Jamaican-born Marcus Garvey found popular support when he urged Harlemites to return to Africa.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Explain how Harlem became the center of African American cultural life.
2. Discuss the contributions to the Harlem Renaissance of a prominent African American writer, artist, or musician.
3. Why did jazz become widely popular during the 1920s?
4. Discuss the rise and fall of Marcus Garvey.
5. Compare the racial views of Marcus Garvey and the Ku Klux Klan.

Suggested Sources: See entries 9, 30, 72, and 73 for related items.

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 311

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.