Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

ver, 1995. Brief biographical treatment, with photographs illustrating Lindbergh’s career and achievements.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

Famous American Speeches: A Multimedia History, 1850 to the Present. Phoenix: Oryx, 1996. CD-ROM. A comprehensive general source. The publisher uses Lindbergh as an example of a search to produce audio clips, video clips, photographs, subjects, additional references, and other materials.

Richardson, Cameron. Are There Any Mechanics Here? Charles Lindbergh and the New York to Paris Flight. New York: National Video Industries, 1995. Videocassette. Award-winning documentary of the transatlantic flight. Contains archival footage, newsreel material, and sound recordings in a 90-minute presentation.


WORLD WIDE WEB

‘‘Ryan NYP ‘Spirit of St. Louis’: First Nonstop Solo Transatlantic Flight.’’ Milestones of Flight Gallery. June 1996. http:www.nasm.edu/GALLERIES/GAL100/stlouis.html A brief descriptive commentary of the flight and its impact from the Smithsonian Institution (Gallery 100). Enumerates the design features of the airplane along with a small picture.


29.

Opposition to Immigration in the 1920s

World War I stopped the flood of immigrants to the United States, but the influx of these newcomers, principally from southern and eastern Europe, then rebounded, reaching 800,000 in 1921. Writers such as Madison Grant fanned the flames of prejudice, as did Henry Ford, who published the fraudulent Protocols of the Elders of Zion in the early 1920s. The notoriety of Italian and Jewish gangsters also fueled prejudice. Congress enacted the Emergency Immigration Act of 1921, which restricted immigration, and the National Origins Act of 1924, which by 1929 was to set yearly immigration at 150,000 and discriminated against southern and eastern Europeans.

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