Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

greatest magician whose incredible feats amazed the nation during the Roaring Twenties.

Vache, Warren W. Jazz Gentry: Aristocrats of the Music World. Blue Ridge, PA: Scarecrow, 1998. Explores the years between the two world wars with the stories of musicians of the time. Based on interviews conducted over a twenty-year period.

Walsh, George. Gentleman Jimmy Walker, Mayor of the Jazz Age. New York: Praeger, 1974. Interesting biography of the dapper New York politician.

Yagoda, Ben. Will Rogers: A Biography. New York: Knopf, 1993. Detailed, interesting, and informative account of the life and career of one of the most influential political humorists of all time.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

This Great Century: 1918–1939—The Years of Jazz/Great Illusions. New York: Central Park Media, 1996. Videocassette. 110 minutes. Treats the birth of jazz as well as Lindbergh’s flight, Hindenburg tragedy, and other events. One of five videocassettes forming the This Great Century series .


WORLD WIDE WEB

Evans, Nick. Culture in the Jazz Age. 1996; updated July 1997. http://cwrl.utexas.edu/∼nick/e309k/jazzage.html A course taught at the University of Texas providing a well-constructed syllabus, listing of texts, and links to jazz sites. Most useful are the sophisticated analyses of important texts by F. Scott Fitzgerald and Langston Hughes, among others.


31.

Stock Market Crash of 1929

Between 1927 and 1929, the stock market rose dramatically and, it turned out, dangerously. Prudent investment yielded to speculation as investors bet that they could reap huge profits. Stockbrokers compounded the risk by permitting investors to buy on margin, that is, by initially paying only a fraction of the stock’s cost, with the balance to come from their profits. Fundamental weaknesses that included a slowing demand for goods and a diminished foreign trade resulting from the nation’s own restrictive trade policies put an end to investor

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