Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

Hiebert, Ray E. The Stock Market Crash, 1929: Panic on Wall Street Ends the Jazz Age. New York: Franklin Watts, 1970. An examination of nine of the most significant days leading to the crash. Similar to the Feinberg book above in being easy to read.

Millichap, Nancy. The Stock Market Crash of 1929. New York: New Discovery Books, 1994. An easy-to-read description from the publisher’s American Events series.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

‘‘The Crash of 1929.’’ The American Experience. Santa Monica, CA: PBS Home Video, 1991. Videocassette. 60-minute documentary of the stock market crash and its aftermath.

The Great Depression: 1929–1939. Mount Kisco, NY: Center for Humanities, 1968. Videocassette. 32-minute overview of the Great Depression; begins with Black Thursday and the panic on Wall Street.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Associated Press. ‘‘Stock Market Crash of 1929, Oct. 29, 1929.’’ Washington Post. September 1997. http://washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/business/longterm/biztalk/grassol/102929.htm Reprint of October 30 article describing the stock market plunge the previous day.


32.

The Great Depression

Many believed that the severe recession that followed the stock market crash of 1929 would be relatively brief. By mid-1931, however, it was clearly turning into a profound depression. Between 1929 and 1933, industrial and farm prices declined precipitously, and unemployment soared to 25 percent of the workforce. Although he feared the creation of a welfare state, President Hoover, unlike some orthodox economists, did not believe in letting the depression run its course. Yet the various measures his administration took failed to restore prosperity. By the end of his term as president, Hoover, who was internationally famous for earlier humanitarian efforts, had become widely reviled.

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