Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES
The Great Depression: 1929–1939. Mount Kisco, NY: Center for Humanities, 1968. Videocassette. Brief (32 minutes) but comprehensive examination of the Great Depression that provides insight into New Deal legislation such as that establishing the CCC.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Civilian Conservation Corps Museum. (Nov. 1997). http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/museum/museccc.html Overview of the museum dedicated to the Michigan participation in CCC. Link to ‘‘Roosevelt’s Tree Army’’ provides a detailed historical narrative.
36.

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (1933)
The origins of TVA date back to the 1920s and the debate over public versus private development and ownership of the nation’s power facilities. A radical New Deal measure, the creation of the TVA in May 1933 was intended to harness for public benefit the power of the Tennessee River, which cut through seven southern states. Multipurpose in goals, the TVA offered jobs, provided inexpensive fertilizers, improved and built dams, reforested depleted areas, and, most controversially, provided cheap public electricity to compete with more costly private power.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Analyze the Muscle Shoals (Alabama) project controversy of the 1920s.
2. Discuss the reaction of private utility companies to the establishment of the TVA.
3. Discuss the reaction to presidential candidate Barry Goldwater’s suggestion in 1964 to privatize the TVA.

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