Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

lightening biography of the important labor leader. Admirably shortened to 387 pages from the initial 1977 effort of 619 pages.

Lichtenstein, Nelson. Walter Reuther: The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit. (1995). Reprint. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997. Detailed and thorough biography of the life and career of one of the foremost labor leaders.

O’Donnell, L. A. Irish Voice and Organized Labor in America: A Biographical Study. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1997. Collective biography of Irish American officials and leaders of the various trade unions.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

The Great Depression and the New Deal. Wynnewood, PA: Schlessinger Media/Library Video. 1996. Videocassette. The eighteenth of twenty titles in the United States History Video Collection, this 35-minute presentation treats the Wagner Act and growth of unions, as well as the Depression and growth of welfare.

Zwerin, Charlotte M. ‘‘Sit Down and Fight: Walter Reuther and the Rise of the Auto Workers Union.’’ The American Experience. Santa Monica, CA: PBS Home Video. 1993. Videocassette. 1-hour profile of the life of Walter Reuther, with emphasis on the early development of the union .


WORLD WIDE WEB

‘‘Federal Labor Law.’’ History of U.S. Labor Law. April 1995. http://garnet.berkeley.edu:3333/.labor/.files/.archive/.labor.law.html Summary of important legislation, drawn from the Congressional Digest, June–July 1993, beginning with the Clayton Act of 1914 and ending with the Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959.


38.

The Dust Bowl

Throughout the 1930s, severely arid conditions in parts of Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma and on the Great Plains uprooted topsoil, turning these areas into huge dust bowls. In 1938, the worst year, an estimated 850 million tons of soil were lost. Unable to produce or to pay their mortgages, numerous farmers abandoned their home sites and headed westward in search of work. Many of these ‘‘Arkies’’ and ‘‘Okies’’ settled in California, whose population soared during the

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