Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

NC: Duke University Press, 1998. Recent examination of the Trujillo years and foreign relations under the Good Neighbor Policy.

Steward, Dick. Trade and Hemisphere: The Good Neighbor Policy and Reciprocal Trade. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1975. Overview of commerce and economic relations with Latin American countries during the period of the Good Neighbor Policy .

Wood, Bryce. The Dismantling of the Good Neighbor Policy. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1985. Good exposition of the decline of the policy with special emphasis on the Argentine situation with Péron.

———. The Making of the Good Neighbor Policy. New York: Norton, 1967. Thorough and well-documented examination of the origin and development of the Good Neighbor policy. Extensive bibliographic references.

Woods, Randall B. The Roosevelt Foreign-Policy Establishment and the ‘‘Good Neighbor’’: The United States and Argentina. Lawrence: Regents Press of Kansas, 1979. Detailed description of foreign relations with Argentina during World War II.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

History of U.S. Foreign Relations—A Series. Springfield, VA: National Audio-Visual Center, 1979. 4 videocassettes. Docudrama begins with ‘‘An Age of Revolutions’’ and traces the development of American foreign policy through its increasing maturity as a nation. Final volume is ‘‘The Road to Interdependence.’’ Each cassette is 30 minutes.


WORLD WIDE WEB

‘‘Addresses and Messages of Franklin D. Roosevelt.’’ U.S. Foreign Policy Development under FDR. June 1996. http://www.sunsite.unc.edu/pha/7–2-188/188title.html Printed as Senate Document No. 188 in 1942 (see General Sources entry above), this is a compilation of official source material intended to present the chronological development of foreign policy from 1933 to February 1942. Can click on any of the documents from the table of contents.


41.

Pre-Pearl Harbor Debate between Isolationists and Interventionists

As international conflicts and crises erupted during the mid-1930s—the Italian-Ethiopian War, the Spanish Civil War, Germany’s reoc-

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 311

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.