Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
Raymer, Edward C. Descent into Darkness: Pearl Harbor, 1941: A Navy Diver’s Memoir. Novato, CA: Presidio, 1996. The story of the salvage efforts on sunken and damaged ships at Pearl Harbor and throughout the Pacific.
AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES
Pearl Harbor: The Eyewitness Story. Wynnwood, PA: Schlessinger/Library Video, 1988. Videocassette. Reenactments, gripping eyewitness stories, and rare historic footage, including captured Japanese war footage in this 70-minute presentation.
WORLD WIDE WEB
‘‘Radio Days—Pearl Harbor.’’ Radio News. November 1996 http://otr.com/pearl.html Brief narrative and radio report of the attack.
43.

Internment of Japanese Americans during World War II (1942–1944)
Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor aggravated existing anti-Japanese sentiment in the United States, particularly on the West Coast, where most Japanese Americans lived and where sabotage and an attack by Japan were most feared. President Roosevelt in February 1942 ordered the evacuation of more than 100,000 Nisei (Japanese born in the United States) and Issei (emigrant Japanese) to internment camps farther east, an action later upheld by the Supreme Court (Korematsu v. United States, 1944). First forced to sell or entrust their possessions, the internees endured humiliating camp conditions. Nonetheless, many Japanese American youths volunteered for military service. All internment camps were closed by late 1944. In 1983 Congress awarded roughly $20,000 to each internment survivor.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Were Japanese Americans a threat to the nation’s security after Pearl Harbor?
2. Analyze why the decision was made to intern Japanese Americans.

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