Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

Watts, 1988. Easy-to-read book that covers Oppenheimer’s life in a thorough, objective manner, quoting heavily from his memoirs.

Rummel, Jack. Robert Oppenheimer: Dark Prince. New York: Facts on File, 1992. Recounts the scientist’s interest in atomic theory and explains the scientific and historic developments that influenced his studies and work.

Smith, Alice K., and Charles Weiner, eds. Robert Oppenheimer: Letters and Recollections. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980. Provides insight into Oppenheimer, the man and the scientist, through his correspondence and reflections.

York, Herbert F. The Advisors: Oppenheimer, Teller, and the Superbomb. (1976). Reprint. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 1989. Interesting and revealing biographical history of the two major scientific minds concerned with the atomic and the hydrogen bomb.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

Peeples, Janet, et al. The Day After Trinity: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Atomic Bomb. Santa Monica, CA: Pyramid Films, 1981. 2 videocassettes. 90-minute documentary on the life of Oppenheimer, with emphasis on his role in the development of the atomic bomb.


WORLD WIDE WEB

‘‘Fat Man and Little Boy: Birth of the Atomic Bomb.’’ American Airpower Heritage Museum Gallery Tour. February 1996. http://avdigest.com/aahm/tratmgal.html Leads to excellent illustrated narratives on various phases of the Manhattan Project, as well as subsequent developments and decisions regarding the bomb.


45.

Women and World War II

Women contributed to wartime efforts in both the military and on the home front. Some 200,000 enlisted for military service, most in either the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) or the Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service (WAVES). The number of wartime women workers increased by nearly 7 million, and by 1945 they constituted slightly more than one-third of the industrial labor force. The poster image of Rosie the Riveter became the patriotic icon for these women, who were doing work previously deemed fitting only for

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