Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

1991. Revealing collection of correspondence from women to their husbands, sweethearts, and brothers in service.

———. We’re in This War Too: World War II Letters from American Women in Uniform. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. Considered to be a valuable addition to World War II history, letters from women in the armed services, and the Red Cross provide insight into training programs, transportation, and war service.

Wingo, Josette D. Mother Was a Gunner’s Mate: World War II in the Waves. Annapolis, MD: U.S. Naval Institute, 1994. Humorous recollections of the author’s training experiences in her eighteen months in the WAVES beginning in 1944.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

The Hidden Army: Women in World War II. Botsford, CT: Filmic Archives, 1995. 3 videocassettes. 53-minutes each cassette. Contains three award-winning documentaries: The Hidden Army—how 18 million women meet the war demands on the home front; Women in Defense, narrated by Katherine Hepburn and written by Eleanor Roosevelt; and Army and Navy Nurse P.O.W.s in WWII, the shocking story of the first women prisoners of war.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Wilson, Barbara A. ‘‘Women in World War II.’’ Women Veterans. May 1996. http://userpages.aug.com/captbarb/femvets5.html Brief but informative historical treatment and useful link to further information created by a retired air force captain. Click on the captain’s home page for coverage of women in various wars.


46.

Minorities and World War II

Like women, minorities contributed substantially to wartime efforts. Significant numbers of African Americans, the nation’s largest minority group, served in the armed forces, although in segregated units in the army. One million African Americans, two-thirds of them women, worked in wartime industries. Pressured by A. Philip Randolph and others, President Roosevelt in 1941 issued an executive order that forbade discrimination in defense industries and established the Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC). Discrimination

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 311

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.