Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

Press, 1991. Details the racism African Americans in the military encountered.

Moore, Brenda L. To Serve My Country, to Serve My Race: The Story of the Only African American WACS Stationed Overseas during World War II. New York: New York University Press, 1996. Examines the military service of the only African American women to serve overseas, the 688 Central Postal Directory Battalion. Based on interviews with former members.

Wynn, Neil A. The Afro-American and the Second World War. New York: Holmes&Meier, 1993. Delineates the role of African Americans in the armed forces and race relations in the United States.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

Tuskegee Airmen. New York: HBO Home Video, 1995. Videocassette. Dramatizes the distinguished exploits of the 332d Fighter Group in a 107-minute film made for cable television.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Papers of the NAACP—Part 13: The NAACP and Labor, 1940–1955. University Publications of America. February 1996. http://www.upapubs.com/guides/naacp13b.htm#scope Fine six-page narrative of NAACP involvement in labor issues regarding fair employment practices and union membership.


47.

Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) (1944)

Allied preparations to invade Europe via France began in early 1942. In January 1944 General Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Great Britain to take command of this gargantuan effort, Operation Overlord. Having decoyed the Germans into believing that they would invade at Calais some 200 miles northward, the Allies on June 6, 1944, launched the greatest amphibious assault in history on the still very heavily defended beaches of Normandy. Over 5,000 ships ferried and supported more than 150,000 Allied troops who secured the beachheads after fierce fighting that cost them 5,000 casualties. Paris fell to the Allies two months later.

-137-

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