Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

BIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES

D’Este, Carlo. Patton: A Genius for War. New York: HarperCollins, 1995. A detailed biography of Patton’s life, with an emphasis on his leadership abilities in war, as well as his assessment of Eisenhower. Osmont, Marie Louise. The Normandy Diary of Marie-Louise Osmont, 1940–1944. New York: Random House, 1994. The author’s experiences living in Normandy during World War II.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

D-Day: The Battle That Liberated the World. Wynewood, PA: Schlessinger/ Library Video, 1998. Discusses the most significant military operation of its time, from the Luftwaffe bombardment of the United Kingdom to the mobilization of the American war industry. 52 minutes.


WORLD WIDE WEB

The 50th Anniversary of the Invasion of Normandy—Operation Overlord. 1994. http://www.nando.net/sproject/dday/dday.html Informative web site treating the planning and execution, equipment, and casualty toll. Links to collection of documents and additional photographs.


48.

Yalta Conference (1945)

In early February 1945 the three Allied leaders—Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin—met at the Black Sea resort of Yalta. There they postponed certain matters, such as the question of postwar German reparations and status, but they did reach some major decisions. The Soviet Union agreed to enter the war against Japan after Germany’s defeat and was to receive important territorial concessions in return. The Big Three also agreed to establish a postwar world organization. Most controversial was their understanding to hold free elections in recently liberated Poland, an agreement that the Soviets failed to abide by and later opened Roosevelt to charges of being naive.

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