Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

Sherwin, Martin J. A World Destroyed: Hiroshima and the Origins of the Arms Race. (1975) Reprint. New York: Vintage, 1987. History of the diplomatic and political circumstances surrounding the development and use of the first atom bomb, with a new introduction and epilogue examining recent developments in the nuclear arms race.

Wyden, Peter. Day One: Before Hiroshima and After. New York: Simon&Schuster, 1984. Synthesizes the literature and interviews both the scientists and the survivors.


BIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES

Ferrell, Robert N. Harry S. Truman and the Bomb: A Documentary History. Worland, WY: High Plains Publishing, 1996. Insight into the event by one of the leading Truman biographers.

Walker, Samuel J. Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs against Japan. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997. Concise, informative account of Truman and his decision to drop the bomb.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

World War II: The War Chronicles Series. New York: A&E Home Video, 1998. 2 videocassettes. The 140-minute Volume 2 treats ‘‘The War in the Pacific’’ from Pearl Harbor to the atomic bombing of Japan; condensed version of the 1983 motion picture by Lou Reda Productions.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Ohba, Mitsuru and John Benson. A-Bomb WWW Museum. June 1995. http://www.csi.ad.jp/ABOMB/index.html A project of Hiroshima City University that provides Japanese perspective. Excellent, informative links such as ‘‘Introduction: About the A-Bomb’’ and ‘‘The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki.’’


50.

United Nations Established (1945)

At the time of the Atlantic Charter in 1941, President Roosevelt had voiced the need for a post–World War II international organization. Support for his idea gained momentum, and at the Dumbarton Oaks

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