Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
http://www.lh.com/un50sf/h/history.htm Brief historical narrative of the founding of the UN.
51.

War Crime Trials (1945–1948)
In 1946 the Allies established an international tribunal in Nuremberg to try twenty-one Germans for crimes against humanity and against the acknowledged rules of warfare committed during World War II. After nearly a year, eleven of the defendants received death sentences; seven others received long prison sentences. Beginning in 1945, similar proceedings took place in Japan, where twenty-five wartime figures were tried and convicted, seven of them condemned to execution. In future years, several thousand defendants were to go on trial in various countries, particularly in Asia. While many applauded the effort to bring perpetrators of wartime atrocities to justice, others were opposed, largely on legal grounds.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Analyze the arguments for and against holding the post–World War II war crime trials.
2. Compare the war crime trials of Germans and Japanese.
3. Discuss the postwar hunt for escaped prominent Nazis.
4. Discuss the capture, trial, and execution of Adolf Eichmann.
5. Discuss attempts to deny the historical existence of the Holocaust.

REFERENCE SOURCES

Encyclopedia of the Third Reich. Christian Zentner et al., eds. New York: Macmillan, 1991. The definitive reference source for basic data on events in Nazi Germany, as well as strong biographical entries.

Great World Trials: The 100 Most Celebrated and Significant Courtroom Battles in World History. Edward W. Knappman, ed. Detroit: Gale, 1997. Trials of political and historical significance in the twentieth century.

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