Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

BIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES

Levy, Michael. Wiesenthal File. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdman’s, 1994. The enthralling story of the most famous Nazi hunter as he searched the world for Nazi war criminals.

Pick, Hella. Simon Wiesenthal: A Life in Search of Justice. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1996. His search for justice for those who died in the Holocaust by finding those who escaped the Nuremberg trials.

Sereny, Gitta. Albert Speer: His Battle with Truth. New York: Knopf, 1995. Based on information from Speer’s family, friends, and colleagues, as well as Allied advisers after the war. Concludes he was an opportunist who served Hitler, outwitted the justices at Nuremberg, and found favor in postwar West Germany.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

Nuremberg: Tyranny on Trial. New York: A&E, 1995. 50-minute documentary examines the historic trials that tested the principles governing the laws of nations, from the accusations through the executions. Interprets the verdicts and historical impact.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Fray, William C., and Lisa A. Spar. ‘‘Nuremberg War Crimes Trials.’’ The Avalon Project: The International Military Tribunal. 1996. http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/imt/imt.htm Complete collection of documents relating to the trials’ motions, rules of procedure, indictments, reports, and so forth. Includes documents cited in the official records, including those from the Hague Conventions.


52.

Cold War Begins

Allied against a common foe during World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union put aside the differences that had divided them since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The Yalta Conference and questions regarding the future of Germany and the organization of the United Nations brought renewed controversy, however, and in the years immediately following the war, differences hardened into a firm opposition that has been labeled the ‘‘cold war.’’ Traditional

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