Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

figures of the mid-twentieth century. Thoroughly researched and engagingly written.

National Portrait Gallery Staff. George C. Marshall: Soldier of Peace. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 1997. Good biography with excellent illustrations.

Pogue, Forrest C. George C. Marshall: Statesman, 1945–1959. New York: Viking, 1987. The fourth and final volume of Pogue’s monumental study of a man who after years of military accomplishment took on the challenges of the post–World War II world.

Saunders, Alan. George C. Marshall: A General for Peace. New York: Facts on File, 1995. Account of the wartime Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman and author of plan that rebuilt Europe after World War II and who won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Stoler, Mark A. George C. Marshall: Soldier-Statesman of the American Century. New York: Macmillan, 1989. Extensive biography of Marshall and his role as chief of staff to both Roosevelt and Truman.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Marshall Plan 50th Anniversary Site. 1997. http://www.marshfdn.com/Operated by the George C. Marshall Foundation, provides valuable links to information. Click on ‘‘European Recovery Program,’’ an eleven-page article by Anne M. Dixon.


55.

NATO Established (1949)

In June 1948 the Soviet Union blocked U.S., British, and French road access to their zones in Western Berlin. The United States retaliated with a successful airlift that lasted until the Soviets ended their obstruction in May the following year. Before that, however, the Truman administration called for an alliance to resist possible Soviet aggression. The result was the establishment of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), signed into agreement on April 4, 1949, by twelve nations. This agreement, which Congress ratified shortly after, stipulated that an attack on any one of its members would be construed as an attack on all.

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