Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

partially on Hiss’s avowed innocence and his unsuccessful attempt to establish it legally.

Hiss, Tony. Laughing Last: Alger Hiss. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1977. Brief biography written thirty years after the trial.

Smith, John C. Alger Hiss, The True Story. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1976. Detailed biography that claims to present the accurate version of Hiss’s career and trial.

Tanenhaus, Sam. Whittaker Chambers: A Biography. New York: Random House, 1997. Exhaustive research on Chambers with emphasis on his life after Hiss; examines his political ideas and contempt for liberalism.

Worth, Esme J. Whittaker Chambers: The Secret Confession. London: Mazzard, 1993. Brief biography of Chambers with clarification of subversive activities in the United States at the time.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

The Spy Who Broke the Code. Santa Monica, CA: PBS Home Video, 1989. Interesting and informative 60-minute interview with a former spy who sold the USSR information about military codes.


WORLD WIDE WEB

‘‘Alger Hiss, Perjurer.’’ Detroit News. December 1996. http://detnews.com/EDITPAGE/9611/20/2edit/2edit.htm Editorial from a conservative newspaper written at the time of Hiss’s death.

Navasky, Victor. ‘‘Alger Hiss.’’ The Nation. December 1996. http://www.thenation.com/issue/961209/1209nava.htm An opposing view from the editor of a liberal journal.


57.

Trial of the Rosenbergs (1950–1951)

The existence of a World War II spy ring that had passed along British and American atomic secrets to the Soviet Union came to light when the British government in 1950 arrested Klaus Fuchs, a physicist who had worked on the Manhattan Project. The German-born Fuchs implicated several others, including the Americans Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. His disclosure came shortly after the Soviet Union tested its first nuclear bomb, thereby destroying America’s monopoly of atomic weaponry. Found guilty of espionage in 1951, the Rosenbergs were

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