Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
versity Press, 1987. A biographical study of Fuchs; extensive thirty-six-page bibliography.
AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES
American Justice: The Rosenbergs. New York: A&E Home Video, 1993. Videocassette. 50-minute presentation on the espionage trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Pizzo, Stephen. The Rosenberg Communiques. Web Review. September 1997. http://www.webreview.com/news/natl/rosenberg/index.html Brief overview of the controversy regarding the question of the Rosenbergs’ punishment. Especially useful is the link to excerpts from the partially decoded Soviet cables released by the National Security Agency in 1995.
58.

McCarthyism (1950–1954)
The cold war brought widespread fear that a communist threat existed from inside the United States as well as from without. Looking for an issue to boost his reelection chances, Joseph R. McCarthy, a Republican senator from Wisconsin, announced in a speech on February 9, 1950, that he had a list containing the names of 205 communists in the State Department. The senator never publicly showed the list, but over the next several years his sensationalistic investigations and hearings intensified the red scare. While some critics spoke out against his tactics and his anti-Democratic political partisanship, he remained popular and powerful until 1954, when his accusations of widespread communism in the U.S. Army backfired, leading to his censure by the Senate.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Analyze the origins of McCarthyism.
2. Discuss HUAC’s investigation of Hollywood.
3. Analyze the effects of McCarthyism on teachers and professors.

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 311

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.