Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview
tier as Thurgood Marshall; Burt Lancaster plays John W. Davis, the opposing counsel, and Richard Kiley is Chief Justice Earl Warren, who rallied the Court to the landmark ruling.
WORLD WIDE WEB
Cozzens, Lisa. Welcome to African American History. July 20, 1998. http://www.watson.org/∼lisa/blackhistory/html Well-developed exposition and description of African American history by a high school teacher. Click on the table of contents providing an overview of the coverage, with Brown v. Board of Education under the category of ‘‘Early Civil Rights Struggle.’’
61.

Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955–1956)
In Montgomery, Alabama, on December 1, 1955, a black woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her bus seat to a white man. Forced from the bus and arrested for disobeying the local segregation ordinance, she contested the matter. Within a few days, the city’s African American community instituted a boycott aimed at eradicating the discrimination practiced by the bus company. Led by a young minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., the Montgomery Improvement Association’s hugely successful boycott lasted for more than a year. In November 1956, the Supreme Court ruled (Gayle et al. v. Browser) that the company’s segregation policy was illegal. Both the boycott and the Court’s decision put an end to Montgomery’s segregated municipal transportation system.
Suggestions for Term Papers
1. Discuss Rosa Parks and her contributions to the civil rights movement during the boycott and in later years.
2. Discuss the role of Martin Luther King, Jr., in the boycott.
3. Analyze why the boycott was successful.
4. What effects did the boycott have on segregated transportation elsewhere?
5. Discuss the long-range consequences of the boycott on the civil rights movement.

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