Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

versity of Tennessee Press, 1987. Good description of the situation in Montgomery through the personal narrative of a participant.

Siegel, Beatrice. The Year They Walked: Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. NY: Simon&Schuster Children’s, 1992. Brief, easy-to-read history of the Montgomery situation and the actions of the participants in the boycott.


BIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES

Friese, Kai. Rosa Parks: The Movement Organizes. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Silver Burdett, 1990. Concise and easy-to-read biography of Rosa Parks and her role in the race relations crisis.

Hull, Mary. Rosa Parks. New York: Chelsea House, 1994. A brief and easy-to-read biography of Parks and her pivotal role in creating the boycott.

Parks, Rosa, and Jim Haskins. Rosa Parks: My Story. New York: Dial Books, 1992. More detailed biography as related by Parks, but still relatively brief.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Montgomery to Memphis. Chicago: Films, Inc. Video, 1970. Videocassette. Comprehensive, 29-minute presentation of King’s life from the Montgomery bus boycott to his assassination. Narration by Harry Belafonte and others.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Jones, Ellis M. The Montgomery Bus Boycott Page. September 1997. http://socsci.colorado.edu/∼jonesem/montgomery.html Contains links to relevant sites and pages such as a periodical article, introductory and biographical information on Rosa Parks, a lesson, and a picture.


62.

Elvis Presley and Rock ’n’ Roll Music

In the early 1950s disc jockey Alan Freed coined the term rock ’n’ roll to describe music then known as rhythm and blues (R&B), which was popular primarily among African Americans. Although a few African American R&B singers gained prominence during the decade, it was the white Mississippi-born Elvis Presley who was mainly responsible for the widespread popularity of rock music with white au-

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