Term Paper Resource Guide to Twentieth-Century United States History

By Robert Muccigrosso; Ron Blazek et al. | Go to book overview

ography providing insight into Eisenhower’s life and orientation. From the American Presidents Series.


PERIODICAL ARTICLES

Beschloss, Michael R. ‘‘The U-2 Crisis.’’ US News and World Report. Pt. 1: ‘‘The Spy Flight That Killed Ike’s Dream,’’ March 24, 1986, 36–41, 44–45. Pt. 2: ‘‘Ike’s Nightmare Summit at Paris,’’ March 31, 1986, 34–37. Interesting and informative two-part account of Eisenhower’s embarrassment over the incident.

Moser, Don. ‘‘The Time of the Angel: The U-2, Cuba, and the CIA.’’ American Heritage 28:4–15 (October 1977). Description of a critical period in U.S.-Soviet relations; use of the U-2 to identify Soviet missiles in Cuba after the Powers incident.


AUDIOVISUAL SOURCES

Francis Gary Powers: The True Story of the U-2 Spy. New York: Worldvision Home Video, 1977. Videocassette. 2-hour television dramatization of the entire event with Lee Majors; based on Powers’s recollections.


WORLD WIDE WEB

Garmon, Linda. ‘‘Spy in the Sky.’’ The American Experience. September 1997. http://www.boston.com/wgbh/pages/amex/u2/u2.html From the PBS television show. Provides useful brief descriptions and excellent links. One is able to click on the real story, photographs taken by the U-2, declassified information regarding its specifications, and other material.


68.

Bay of Pigs Invasion (1961)

Dismayed by Fidel Castro’s confiscation of the property of American businesses, his trade agreement with the Soviet Union, and his repressive measures, President Eisenhower in 1960 ordered the CIA to undermine his regime. Newly elected President Kennedy approved the CIA plan but without American airpower to protect the invading force of 1,400 anti-Castro Cubans. The latter landed at the Bay of Pigs on April 17, 1961, but without air support and the expected uprising of the Cuban people, the invasion failed dismally. Fewer than

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