The Telecommunications Industry

By Susan E. McMaster | Go to book overview

5

The Development of Long-Distance Competition, 1982–1996

The agreement reached by the Department of Justice and AT&T went into effect at midnight on January 1, 1984, ending the structure of the telecommunications industry as it had been known and bringing the true start to competition in long-distance service and equipment manufacturing. The industry changed in many ways over the next 12 years. Several new companies entered the industry, and other fledgling companies that had been struggling to survive grew immensely. As competition increased, the regulations governing the industry were adapted to suit changing overall conditions and market shares in various industry segments. The courts continued to play an important role in the industry, as they had previously. Both new competitors and the incumbent carriers seemed to turn to court proceedings when they were not satisfied with their treatment by the FCC. Technology continued to develop, as it had for the previous 100 years. A variety of innovations and improvements were introduced that brought almost continual change to the industry. Thus, although the industry was operating under a completely revised framework, it continued to grow and expand throughout the period, offering more products and services for consumers.


THE BREAKUP OF AT&T

The case to break up AT&T proceeded on a number of different fronts at the beginning of the 1980s. The DoJ was conducting its ongoing antitrust case in the courtroom of Judge Harold Greene.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Telecommunications Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 193

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.