Gothic Writers: A Critical and Bibliographical Guide

By Douglass H. Thomson; Jack G. Voller et al. | Go to book overview

GERTRUDE ATHERTON
(1857–1948)

Jack G. Voller


PRINCIPAL GOTHIC WORKS

“Death and the Woman.” Vanity Fair 49 (1892): 25–26.

“A Christmas Witch.” Godey’s Magazine 126 (January 1893): 9–40.

“The Twins.” Speaker [London], 20 June 1896: 664–665. (Original title of “The Striding Place.”)

“The Dead and the Countess.” Smart Set 7 (1902): 55–61. The Bell in the Fog and Other Stories. New York and London: Harper & Brothers, 1905; London and New York: Macmillan, 1905.

“The Foghorn.” Good Housekeeping, 97 (1933): 16–17, 129–132.

The Foghorn Stories. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1934; (Contains “The Eternal Now,” “The Striding Place,” “The Foghorn,” “The Greatest Good of the Greatest Number” [First published in The Bell in the Fog].)

Contemporary California Short Stories. [San Francisco]: Book Club of California, 1937. (Vol. 4 contains “The Foghorn.”)

The Haunted Omnibus. Ed. Alexander Lang and Lynd Ward New York: Farrar & Rinehart, 1937. (Contains “The Foghorn.”)


MODERN REPRINTS AND EDITIONS

The Bell in the Fog and Other Stories. New York: MSS Information Corp., 1968. (The American Short Story series, vol. 1. Rpt. of the 1905 edition.)

The Foghorn. Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, 1970.

Haunted Women: The Best Supernatural Tales by American Women Writers. Ed. Alfred Bendixen. New York: Ungar, 1985, 1986; New York: Continuum, 1985, 1987. (An excellent collection that contains “The Bell in the Fog.”)

Born on the day before Halloween in 1857, Gertrude Horn Atherton became and remains best known for those works that have led many critics to label her a “regionalist” in her novels and stories of California. Such a label is, in Ath-

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Gothic Writers: A Critical and Bibliographical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • John Aikin and Anna Laetitia Aikin Barbauld 1
  • William Harrison Ainsworth 7
  • Ueda Akinari 12
  • Gertrude Atherton 20
  • Margaret Atwood 24
  • Jane Austen and the Northanger Novelists 33
  • Fran}ois Thomas Marie de Baculard d}Arnaud 48
  • William Beckford 53
  • Ambrose Gwinett Bierce 60
  • Charlotte Bronte and Emily Bronte 69
  • Charles Brockden Brown 76
  • Edward Bulwer-Lytton 83
  • Wilkie Collins 90
  • Charlotte Dacre [Rosa Matilda] 99
  • Charles Dickens 104
  • Fran}ois Guillaume Ducray-Duminil 116
  • Mary Wilkins Freeman 120
  • William Godwin 125
  • Gothic Chapbooks, Bluebooks, and Short Stories in the Magazines 133
  • Gothic Drama 147
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne 165
  • E[rnst] T[heodor] A[madeus] Hoffmann 177
  • James Hogg 185
  • Washington Irving 195
  • Henry James 202
  • Stephen King 212
  • Izumi Kyoka 225
  • D. H. Lawrence 233
  • Sophia Lee 241
  • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu 248
  • Matthew Gregory }Monk} Lewis 254
  • George Lippard 261
  • H[oward] P[hillips] Lovecraft 270
  • Arthur Machen 278
  • Charles Robert Maturin 283
  • Herman Melville 290
  • Toni Morrison 295
  • Joyce Carol Oates 303
  • Flannery O}Connor 315
  • Vladimir Fyodorovich Odoevsky 321
  • Edgar Allan Poe 330
  • John Polidori 344
  • Ann Radcliffe 349
  • Clara Reeve 361
  • Count Donatien Alphonse Fran}ois Sade 365
  • Friedrich von Schiller 372
  • Sir Walter Scott 380
  • Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley 389
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley 399
  • Charlotte Turner Smith 408
  • Robert Louis Stevenson 412
  • Bram Stoker 420
  • Ludwig Tieck 429
  • Horace Walpole 437
  • General Bibliography of Critical Sources and Resources 457
  • Index of Authors and Titles 469
  • Index of Critics, Editors, and Translators 501
  • About the Editors and Contributors 515
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