Housing Policy Systems in South and East Asia

By Mohammed Razali Agus; John Doling et al. | Go to book overview

two or more countries is considered together so that, implicitly or explicitly, differences and similarities between countries can be explored, interpreted and analytically developed.

This comparative stage has not yet been greatly developed in relation to the industrialised and industrialising countries of south and east Asia. Certainly, there are numerous papers and a steady trickle of books about housing in the individual countries, some of which are accessible to a wider audience than the national one, if only by virtue of publication in English. Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and possibly to a lesser extent Japan and Taiwan, are most notable in this respect. But publications that bring housing policy in all these countries, as well as others, together in one volume – thus allowing some explicit comparison – are not a significant feature of the publishing landscape. One notable exception is the collection of chapters about individual Asian countries brought together by Seong-Kyu Ha (Ha 1987). However, much has happened in the intervening years, not least because the countries included have themselves moved on. Economic growth rates at levels common throughout the more advanced countries of the region have been in general (with the major exception of the Asian financial crisis post-1997 period) quite spectacular by western standards. In some cases, real GDP doubled over the period. In such circumstances, cities, buildings, infrastructure and people's aspirations and spending power do not remain constant. Both the context of housing policy and the policies themselves have therefore changed considerably.

One aspect of the challenge that we as a group of editors have chosen to take up is to contribute to the development of the comparative study of housing policy in Asia. This volume examines housing policy in a number of countries through the the latter half of the twentieth century, encompassing not only periods of dynamic growth but also the Asian financial crisis. The challenge has been to fill a widening hole in the literature, and to add something better to it. We also hope that our colleagues in both the west and east will find this book interesting and stimulating.

We anticipate that for western readers interest will be both theoretical and practical, located in an Asian model of economic, political and social organisation that in some ways differs distinctly from models in the west. The interest centres on questions of whether the extent to which the Asian model differs from western models can tell us anything about the relationship between the economic and the social. The

-xiii-

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Housing Policy Systems in South and East Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables viii
  • List of Figures x
  • List of Contributors xi
  • Foreword xii
  • References xvi
  • 1 - Asian Housing Policy: Similarities and Differences 1
  • Note *
  • References 18
  • 2 - Japan 20
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 3 - Singapore 38
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 4 - Hong Kong 60
  • Notes 80
  • References 82
  • 5 - Taiwan 84
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 6 - Korea 104
  • References *
  • 7 - Malaysia 127
  • Note *
  • References *
  • 8 - Thailand 146
  • Note *
  • References *
  • 9 - Indonesia 161
  • References *
  • 10 - The South and East Asian Housing Policy Model 178
  • References *
  • Index 189
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