Music Criticism in Vienna, 1896-1897: Critically Moving Forms

By Sandra McColl | Go to book overview

1
The Papers and the Critics

Before beginning a detailed examination of what the critics wrote, it is necessary to sort out the journals in which they wrote and, indeed, just who the critics themselves were. The lists of journals and critics provided in this chapter are intended to serve as a guide for reference in the following chapters.

The purpose of the first section of this chapter is to list the various journals and papers from which the feuilletons and other items of journalism have been taken, in order to give a brief overview of their respective policies. Circulation figures are given, where known. These should be seen in the context of an increasing population (the population of Vienna being between the 1,364,548 recorded in 18901 and the 1,674,57 recorded in 19002) and improving literacy rate. The Austrian--Cisleithanian--part of the empire had 13,258,452 people who could read and write, 1,031,624 who could only read, and 9,605,337 who were illiterate (= c.60% with basic literacy) in 1890,3 and 16,067,972 who could read and write, 778,782 who could read only, and 9,303,945 who were illiterate (= c.64.5% with basic literacy) in 1900.4 It would, moreover, not be unreasonable to suppose that a major urban centre such as Vienna would have a higher literacy rate than more isolated rural areas. The second section of the chapter will deal with the critics.


The Papers

The Specialist Music Journals

In 1896-7, among the journals published in Vienna devoted entirely or largely to music, three, the Deutsche Kunst- und Musikzeitung, Neue Musikalische Presse, and Österreichische Musik- und Theaterzeitung offered significant coverage of the musical events also dealt with by the newspapers. These journals are essential sources of detailed accounts of musical events, since with their number of critics and the lack of competition for

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1
The Statesman's Yearbook: Statistical and Historical Annual of the States of the World for the Year 1897, ed. J. Scott Keltie, secretary to the Royal Geographical Society, with I. P. A. Renwick, 34th edn. ( London: Macmillan, 1897), 344.
2
Statesman's Yearbook, 40th edn. ( 1903), 415.
3
Statesman's Yearbook ( 1897), 346.
4
Statesman's Yearbook, 47th edn. ( 1910), 599.

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Music Criticism in Vienna, 1896-1897: Critically Moving Forms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Contents xii
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I- Papers, Critics, and Events 9
  • 1- The Papers and the Critics 11
  • 2- The Richness of Everyday Life 33
  • Part II- Politics, Civil and Artistic 85
  • 3- Civil Politics and Musical Opinion 87
  • 4- The Politics of Art In The Aftermath of Wagner 108
  • Part III- Beneath the Rhetoric 167
  • 5- The 'Canon' in the Concert Hall 169
  • 6- Opera, Drama, and The Artwork of the Future 199
  • Conclusion 223
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 233
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