Music Criticism in Vienna, 1896-1897: Critically Moving Forms

By Sandra McColl | Go to book overview

Conclusion

In his tirade against journalism, Max Graf observes in it 'a total lack of any religious or metaphysical sensibility' and a 'lack of feeling for the eternal wellspring of art'. The evidence contradicts this statement. Critics saw themselves as guardians of the artistic tradition and if they rejected new currents it was because they saw them, rightly or wrongly, as emanating from a different source or as continuing the development of music in the wrong direction. Art, especially music, was generally regarded as possessing a special holiness. Composers and performers who were perceived to be using it merely as a vehicle for personal technical display were roundly taken to task.

Other qualities which Graf perceives to be missing from the journalistic outlook are 'personal experience . . . hearkening to inner and outer voices', 'contemplation', and 'self-consciousness'. This is in stark contrast with the opinion from hindsight of Schorske, who judged the feuilleton, which happened to be the dominant genre of music criticism at the time, to be characterized by 'excessive subjectivism and narcissism'.1 The evidence of the music criticisms points, however, to the coexistence of a continual consciousness in critics of the personal and subjective nature of their judgements and to their attempts to justify their decisions in terms of the presence or absence of a coherent musical argument.

As for personal experience, in particular in the matter of music, the critics who wrote the most (i.e. the 'senior' critics of their journals) seem to have been out nearly every night in the concert season; they were professional listeners whose personal experience of music had been accumulating for years. Instead of narcissistically contemplating their own inner lives, they contemplated scores and musical sounds. At least, this seems a fair view to take of the critics at their best.

Not forgetting that Graf was writing from a Wagnerian point of view and warming up to an attack on Hanslick, it is wise to consider just what it was about Hanslick that so infuriated Graf. In the first place, they disagreed strongly on the matter of Wagnerism, to which Graf seems to have formed an almost religious adherence. In addition, Hanslick was an excellent writer. Nothing is more annoying than to find views with which one profoundly disagrees expressed with brilliance and humour. And that is exactly what Hanslick did. Humour, an essential weapon in his armoury, seems to have aided his detractors, Graf chief among them, in reaching

____________________
1
Fin-de-siècle Vienna, 152.

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Music Criticism in Vienna, 1896-1897: Critically Moving Forms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Contents xii
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I- Papers, Critics, and Events 9
  • 1- The Papers and the Critics 11
  • 2- The Richness of Everyday Life 33
  • Part II- Politics, Civil and Artistic 85
  • 3- Civil Politics and Musical Opinion 87
  • 4- The Politics of Art In The Aftermath of Wagner 108
  • Part III- Beneath the Rhetoric 167
  • 5- The 'Canon' in the Concert Hall 169
  • 6- Opera, Drama, and The Artwork of the Future 199
  • Conclusion 223
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.