The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia

By Maurine H. Beasley; Holly C. Shulman et al. | Go to book overview

WELL-KNOWN QUOTATIONS BY ELEANOR ROOSEVELT

“[A]s a rule women know not only what men know, but much that men will never know. For, how many men really know the heart and soul of a woman?” (“My Day,” 6 March 1937)

“[T]he most important thing in any relationship is not what you get but what you give.” (This Is My Story, 1937, p. 361)

“People can gradually be brought to understand that an individual, even if she is a President’s wife, may have independent views and must be allowed the expression of an opinion. But actual participation in the work of the government, we are not yet able to accept.” (“My Day,” 23 February 1942)

“A woman will always have to be better than a man in any job she undertakes.” (“My Day,” 29 November 1945)

“It is very difficult to have a free, fair, and honest press anywhere in the world. In the first place, as a rule, papers are largely supported by advertising, and that immediately gives the advertisers a certain hold over the medium which they use.” (If You Ask Me, 1946, p. 51)

“For it isn’t enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn’t enough to believe in it. One must work at it.” (Broadcast, Voice of America, 11 November 1951)

“You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face…. You must do the thing you think you cannot do.” (You Learn by Living, 1960, pp. 29–30)

-xxvii-

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The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations and Charts ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Chronology of Eleanor Roosevelt’s Life and Career xxiii
  • Well-Known Quotations by Eleanor Roosevelt xxvii
  • A 1
  • B 44
  • C 75
  • D 122
  • E 152
  • F 166
  • G 204
  • H 222
  • I 267
  • J 278
  • K 287
  • L 294
  • M 323
  • N 359
  • O 383
  • P 396
  • R 425
  • S 474
  • T 509
  • U 531
  • V 542
  • W 549
  • Y 591
  • Z 596
  • Index 599
  • Editors 618
  • Contributors 619
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