The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia

By Maurine H. Beasley; Holly C. Shulman et al. | Go to book overview

R

RADIO BROADCASTS. Eleanor Roosevelt had a successful career as a radio broadcaster that spanned much of her public life. One of the first notable women in radio, she delivered news commentary and human interest material and backed causes in which she believed. Her sponsored broadcasts over major networks both enlarged the concept of radio performance by individuals in public life and affirmed the right of married women to earn money on their own.

ER’s radio career began in the 1920s, when she spoke occasionally over New York stations, giving, for example, a talk in 1925 in praise of the civic ideals of the Women’s City Club.* It expanded after Franklin D. Roosevelt* was elected president in 1932. In the preinaugural period between 9 December 1932 and 24 February 1933, ER delivered a series of twelve radio commentaries sponsored by Pond’s, a cold cream manufacturer, chiefly on child raising and family relations. After the Pond’s radio series generated newspaper criticism that the future First Lady was using her name “for commercial purposes,” she announced that she intended to accept no more radio contracts (Beasley and Belgrade, 42).

In 1934, however, ER resumed commercial broadcasting. Going off-the-record at one of her women-only press conferences,* she expressed her determination to “get the money for a good cause [charity] and take the gaff ” (Beasley and Belgrade, 42). She broadcast first for a roofing company, which paid her $500 per minute, the same amount earned by the highest-paid radio stars, and then for the Simmons Mattress Company at the same rate for five commentaries on highlights of the week’s news. After that contract ended, she presented six fifteen-minute talks on education for the American typewriter industry, and in 1935 the Selby Shoe Company sponsored her broadcasts. Speaking in a personal, con-

-425-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations and Charts ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Chronology of Eleanor Roosevelt’s Life and Career xxiii
  • Well-Known Quotations by Eleanor Roosevelt xxvii
  • A 1
  • B 44
  • C 75
  • D 122
  • E 152
  • F 166
  • G 204
  • H 222
  • I 267
  • J 278
  • K 287
  • L 294
  • M 323
  • N 359
  • O 383
  • P 396
  • R 425
  • S 474
  • T 509
  • U 531
  • V 542
  • W 549
  • Y 591
  • Z 596
  • Index 599
  • Editors 618
  • Contributors 619
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.