Villon's Last Will: Language and Authority in the Testament

By Tony Hunt | Go to book overview

Appendix 2
Glossary of Rhetorical Terms
adynata paradoxical notions involving natural impossibilities, especially through inversion of the natural order of things
alliteration repetition of the initial consonant in two or more words
anacoluthon a grammatical sequence in which there is a sudden change of construction, the first being left incomplete. See aposiopesis
anadiplosis (reduplicatio) a linking device in which a 'key word' at the end of one syntactic/metrical word-group is repeated at the beginning of the next
anaphora (repetitio) repetition of the same word or rhyme at the beginning of successive clauses, sentences, or verses
anastrophe see hyperbaton
annominatio (polyptoton) the repetition of words in different case forms or as different derivatives of the same etymological root
anteoccupatio the anticipation of objections or criticisms
antiphrasis use of words expressing the opposite of their intended meaning
antonomasia (pronominatio) the use of an adjective or noun phrase to replace a proper name or, conversely, the use of a proper name generically as a common noun
aposiopesis the suspension of a grammatical construction before it is completed. See anacoluthon
asyndeton (dissolutio) the co-ordination of words, phrases, or clauses without the use of conjunctions or connectives
binomial (conduplicatio) a phrase comprising two words, often near synonyms, linked by a conjunction, forming an idiomatic phrase, sometimes known as a doublet
chiasmus (antistrophe, antimetabole) repetition of elements or words in reverse order
climax (gradatio) a sequence of elements, especially arguments, in ascending order of magnitude or significance. Sometimes an extended form of anadiplosis (q.v.)
conative striving to influence an addressee (as opposed to being concerned with affective self-expression)
contentio antithesis, opposition
correctio correction of a statement from either self or an adversary
dead metaphor an expression which has lost its literal sense, retaining only

-146-

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Villon's Last Will: Language and Authority in the Testament
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Writing and the Fragmentation of Authority 13
  • 2- Praise and Blame 34
  • 3- Love's Martyrs 50
  • 4- The Voice of Morality 72
  • 5- Dialogue 82
  • 6- Rhetoric and Irony 97
  • 7- The Indeterminate Author 125
  • Appendix 1 Villon and the Mendicants 143
  • Appendix 2 Glossary of Rhetorical Terms 146
  • Appendix 3 The Use of Anadiplosis in The Introduction to the Testament 149
  • Appendix 4 Binomial Expressions in the Testament 151
  • Bibliography 154
  • Index of Rhetorical Terms (see Also Appendix 2) 157
  • Index of Persons 158
  • Index of Lines Cited 160
  • Index of Subjects 165
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