A Companion to Old and Middle English Literature

By Laura Cooner Lambdin; Robert Thomas Lambdin | Go to book overview

and enduring popularity. Humans are fascinated by the animal world and attempt, wherever possible, to impose their humanity (both virtues and vices) upon it. Twentieth-century versions of the bestiary and beast-fable traditions range from television cartoons to animal documentaries, from Sunday comic strips to naturalists– field guides. These versions, like their forebears, provide the elements required by The Canterbury Tales– storytelling game: they are both edifying and entertaining. More than mere anthropomorphism, the beast fable makes a point (and an art) of saying more about its tellers than about its subjects.


SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Barber, Richard, ed. and trans. Bestiary. Woodbridge, Eng.: Boydell Press, 1993.

Barnhart, Clarence L., ed. The New Century Handbook of English Literature. Rev. ed. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1967.

Baxter, Ron. Bestiaries and Their Users in the Middle Ages. Stroud: Sutton; London: Courtauld Institute, 1998.

Bennett, J.A.W., and G.V. Smithers, eds. Early Middle English Verse and Prose. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1966.

Benson, Larry D., ed. The Riverside Chaucer. 3rd ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987.

Blake, N.F., ed. The Phoenix. 2 Rev. ed. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1990.

Clark, Willene B., and Meradith T. McMunn, eds. Beasts and Birds of the Middle Ages. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1989.

Cook, Albert Stanburrough, ed. and prose trans. The Old English Physiologus. Verse trans. James Hall Pitman. Yale Studies in English 63. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1921. Rpt. in Translations from the Old English. Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1970.

Elliott, Charles, ed. Robert Henryson: Poems. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1963.

The Exeter Book. Ed. George Philip Krapp and Elliott Van Kirk Dobbie. The Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records. New York: Columbia University Press, 1936.

The Exeter Book. Ed. W.S. Mackie and Israel Gollancz. Early English Text Society O.S. nos. 104, 194. London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co., 1895–1934, Millwood, NY: Kraus Reprint, 1987–1988.

Garbáty, Thomas J., ed. Medieval English Literature. Lexington, MA.: Heath, 1984.

Gopen, George D., ed. and trans. The Moral Fables of Aesop by Robert Henryson. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1987.

Henderson, Arnold Clayton. “Medieval Beasts and Modern Cages: The Making of Meaning in Fables and Bestiaries.” PMLA 97 (1982): 40–49.

Honegger, Thomas. From Phoenix to Chauntecleer: Medieval English Animal Poetry. Swiss Studies in English 120. Tübingen and Basel: Francke Verlag, 1996.

Howard, Donald R., and James Dean, eds. The Canterbury Tales: A Selection. New York: New American Library, 1969.

International Reynard Society (Beast Epic, Fable & Fabliau). Online. 2 May 2000. http://www.hull.ac.uk/french/fox.html.

Jacobs, John C., ed. and trans. The Fables of Odo of Cheriton. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1985.

Mann, Jill. “Beast Epic and Fable.”Medieval Latin: An Introduction and Bibliographical

-84-

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A Companion to Old and Middle English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Old English and Anglo-Norman Literature 1
  • Selected Bibliography 23
  • 2 - Religious and Allegorical Verse 26
  • 3 - Alliterative Poetry in Old and Middle English 37
  • Selected Bibliography 48
  • 4 - Balladry 50
  • Selected Bibliography 66
  • 5 - The Beast Fable 69
  • Selected Bibliography 84
  • 6 - Breton Lay 86
  • 7 - Chronicle 98
  • 8 - Debate Poetry 118
  • Selected Bibliography 152
  • 9 - Medieval English Drama 154
  • 10 - Dream Vision 178
  • Selected Bibliography 196
  • 11 - Epic and Heroic Poetry 210
  • 12 - The Epic Genre and Medieval Epics 230
  • Selected Bibliography 253
  • 13 - The Fabliau 255
  • 14 - Hagiographic, Homiletic, and Didactic Literature 277
  • Selected Bibliography 294
  • 15 - Lyric Poetry 299
  • 16 - The Middle English Parody/ Burlesque 315
  • Selected Bibliography 333
  • 17 - Riddles 336
  • 18 - Romance 352
  • Selected Bibliography 373
  • 19 - Visions of the Afterlife 376
  • Selected Bibliography 394
  • Selected Bibliography 399
  • Index 425
  • About the Editors and Contributors 431
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