A Companion to Old and Middle English Literature

By Laura Cooner Lambdin; Robert Thomas Lambdin | Go to book overview

destroy that ideal, but to define it more clearly and to reach agreement on the detailed choices and decisions with which it confronts society” (324–325). Piero Boitani–s English Medieval Narrative in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries considers technique in a different light by looking closely at religious and comic traditions, dream, and vision. Boitani defines the world of romance and studies narrative collections, Gower, and especially Chaucer. Chronicle and its relationship to romance are also investigated by Rosalind Field–s article “Romance as History, History as Romance” in Romance in Medieval England, edited by Maldwyn Mills, Jennifer Fellows, and Carol M. Meale. Field concludes, in part, “History will continue to appeal (to the popular mind, we may say defensively) in terms of romance stereotype and mythic patterning; and romance will continue to provide a view of history which is acceptable and comprehensible.... The longevity of the historical myth created by the Anglo-Norman writers and preserved as ‘tradition– by Middle English writers is impressive” (173).


SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

a

Amster, Mark E. “Literary Theory and the Genres of Middle English Literature.” Genre 13 (1980): 389–396.


b

Barron, W.R.J., ed. The Arthur of the English: The Arthurian Legend in Medieval English Life and Literature. Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages 2. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1999.

Benson, Larry D. Malory–s Morte Darthur. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1976.

Boitani, Piero. English Medieval Narrative in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries. Trans. Joan Krakover Hall. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Bordman, Gerald. Motif-Index of the English Metrical Romances. FF Communications No. 190. Ed. for the Folklore Fellows by Reidar Th. Christiansen et al. Helsinki: Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia, Academia Scientiarum Fennica, 1963.

Bradbury, Nancy Mason. Writing Aloud: Storytelling in Late Medieval England. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998.


c

Carley, James P. “England.” Medieval Arthurian Literature: A Guide to Recent Research. Ed. Norris J. Lacy. New York: Garland, 1996. 1–82.


d

Dillon, Bert. “A Clerk Ther Was of Oxenford Also.” Chaucer–s Pilgrims: An Historical Guide to the Pilgrims in The Canterbury Tales. Ed. Laura C. Lambdin and Robert T. Lambdin. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996. 108–115.

Donovan, Mortimer J. “Breton Lays.” A Manual of the Writings in Middle English, 1050–1500. Gen. ed. J. Burke Severs. New Haven: Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1967. 1:133–143, 292–297.

Dunn, Charles W. “Romances Derived from English Legends.” A Manual of the Writings in Middle English, 1050–1500. Gen. ed. J. Burke Severs. New Haven: Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1967. 1:17–37, 206–224.


f

Field, P.J.C. Romance and Chronicle: A Study of Malory–s Prose Style. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1971.

Field, Rosalind. “Romance as History, History as Romance.” Romance in Medieval England. Ed. Maldwyn Mills, Jennifer Fellows, and Carol M. Meale. Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 1991. 163–173.

-373-

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A Companion to Old and Middle English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Old English and Anglo-Norman Literature 1
  • Selected Bibliography 23
  • 2 - Religious and Allegorical Verse 26
  • 3 - Alliterative Poetry in Old and Middle English 37
  • Selected Bibliography 48
  • 4 - Balladry 50
  • Selected Bibliography 66
  • 5 - The Beast Fable 69
  • Selected Bibliography 84
  • 6 - Breton Lay 86
  • 7 - Chronicle 98
  • 8 - Debate Poetry 118
  • Selected Bibliography 152
  • 9 - Medieval English Drama 154
  • 10 - Dream Vision 178
  • Selected Bibliography 196
  • 11 - Epic and Heroic Poetry 210
  • 12 - The Epic Genre and Medieval Epics 230
  • Selected Bibliography 253
  • 13 - The Fabliau 255
  • 14 - Hagiographic, Homiletic, and Didactic Literature 277
  • Selected Bibliography 294
  • 15 - Lyric Poetry 299
  • 16 - The Middle English Parody/ Burlesque 315
  • Selected Bibliography 333
  • 17 - Riddles 336
  • 18 - Romance 352
  • Selected Bibliography 373
  • 19 - Visions of the Afterlife 376
  • Selected Bibliography 394
  • Selected Bibliography 399
  • Index 425
  • About the Editors and Contributors 431
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