The Common Good in Late Medieval Political Thought

By M. S. Kempshall | Go to book overview

II
Remigio dei Girolami--The Order of Love

The historical significance which is usually ascribed to Remigio dei Girolami derives from two aspects of his life and work. Remigio attended the faculty of arts in Paris in the late 1260s and joined the Dominican convent of Saint Jacques during the second regency of Thomas Aquinas. His subsequent activities as a Dominican friar in Florence are therefore frequently cited as an example of how academic scholasticism could serve wider pastoral concerns in society. As lector at Santa Maria Novella from c. 1273 to 1319, not only did Remigio prepare a corpus of written material for the Dominican studium, but, by his preaching and teaching, he also mediated the learning of the Paris schools to a much wider audience amongst his fellow-citizens.1 Remigio is thus a prime candidate for providing the 'disputazioni de li filosofanti' which Dante describes attending in the 'scuole de li religiosi'.2 Remigio has attracted attention, however, for more than just his propagation of scholastic philosophy and theology. As the author of De Bono Communi and De Bono Pacis,3 he is also frequently cited as the proponent of an 'extreme corporationalism', a political theorist who used Aristotle's account of the perfect human association in order to subordinate the individual to a 'dangerous idealisation' of the commune.4

____________________
1
C. T. Davis, "'Remigio de' Girolami" O. P. Lector of S. Maria Novella in Florence', in Le Scuole degli Ordini Mendicanti (Convegni del Centro di Studi sulla Spiritualità Medievale 17. 1986, Todi, 1978), 283-304; E. Panella, Per lo studio di Fra Remigio dei Girolami (Memorie Domenicane 10. 1979), esp. appendix II "'Contributi alla Biografia Remigiana'", 183-241; appendix III, "'Le Opere di fra Remigio dei Girolami'", 243-83. Cf. D. R. Lesnick, Preaching in Medieval Florence: The Social World of Franciscan and Dominican Spirituality ( Athens, Ga., 1989), 96-118; D. L. D'Avray, Death and the Prince: Memorial Preaching before 1350 ( Oxford, 1994), 79-85, 142-7.
2
Dante, Convivio, ed. E. G. Parodi and F. Pellegrini, in Le Opere di Dante, 2nd edn. ( Florence, 1960), II.12, p. 185. Cf. M. Grabmann, 'Remigio de' Girolami, der Schüler des Heiligen Thomas und Lehrer Dantes', in id., Mittelalterliches Geistesleben I ( Munich, 1926), 361-9; E. Gilson, 'Les Philosophantes', AHDLMA 19 ( 1952), 135-40; C. T. Davis, "'Remigio de' Girolami and Dante: A Comparison of their Conceptions of Peace'", Studi Danteschi, 36 ( 1959), 123-36; id., Dante and the Idea of Rome ( Oxford, 1957), 80-6.
3
ed. M. C. de Matteis, La 'teologia politica communale' di Remigio de' Girolami ( Bologna, 1977), PP. 3-51, 55-71 Cf. L. Minio-Paluello, "'Remigio Girolami's De bono communi: Florence at the Time of Dante's Banishment and the Philosopher's Answer to the Crisis'", Italian Studies, II ( 1956), 56-71.
4
C. T. Davis, "'An Early Florentine Political Theorist: Fra Remigio de' Girolami'", Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 104 ( 1960), 669-70. Cf. R. Egenter, "'Gemeinnutz vor Eigennutz: Die soziale Leitidee im Tractatus de bono communi des Fr. Remigius von Florenz'", Scholastik, 9 ( 1934), 79-92; G. de Lagarde, La Naissance de l'esprit laique au déclin du moyen àge, 3rd edn. ( 5 vols.; Louvain, 1956-70), ii. 316; E. H. Kantorowicz, The King's Two Bodies ( Princeton, 1957), 478-80; J. K. Hyde, 'Contemporary Views on Faction and Civil Strife in Thirteenth and Fourteenth Century Italy', in L. Martines (ed.), Violence and Disorder in Italian Cities 1200-1500 ( Berkeley, 1972), 302-3; Matteis, La 'teologia politica communale', pp. cxxx-cxxxi; P. Hibst, Utilitas Publica--Gemeiner Nutz--Gemeinwohl ( Frankfurt, 1991), 189-93.

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