The Common Good in Late Medieval Political Thought

By M. S. Kempshall | Go to book overview

12
Remigio dei Girolami--Peace and Order

Remigio dei Girolami was interested in more than just an intellectual defence of the principle that greater love should be shown towards the common good as the good on which the individual good depends for its existence. He was also intent on explaining just how this principle could, and should, be translated into the actual conduct of the community he was addressing. Remigio's handling of the scholastic notion of the common good accordingly provides a revealing example of the complexity of the connection between the theoretical analysis of goodness by a scholastic theologian and its practical application to political society. On occasion, Remigio offers his own actions as a model for such a transfer.1 In requiring that the Priors should consider the common good to be their own good, for example, and that they should demonstrate a greater love for it in accordance with Augustine Rule, Remigio points out that one such manifestation would be a contribution towards the cost of a building which Remigio had just begun for the needs of the Dominican Order and the good of the political community (nostrum et etiam communis bonum et necessitatem) and to which he had himself contributed by raising funds from the sale of Dominican books.2 Likewise, in expressing his own unwillingness to go to Paris to read the Sentences, he suggests that it would be offset were it to be subordinated to the good of the Dominican Order.3 The real force of Remigio's practical application of his analysis of the common good, however, was reserved for Florentine politics.

Remigio's understanding of the relationship between the individual and the common good was conditioned by a particularly turbulent decade in the history of Florence. From 1293 to 1295, political life was dominated by the anti-magnate movement of the popolani under Giano della Bella, a conflict which culminated in the proscription of certain noble families from holding public office. After 1295, politics were dominated by bitter familial feuding between the Cerchi and the Donati, the 'White' and 'Black' Guelfs. In May 1300, Boniface VIII appointed Cardinal Matthew of Acquasparta as legate to Florence, a move which he made explicitly in the interests of peace but which only resulted in a series of excommunications. In

____________________
1
It is worth pointing out, in this context, the possible personal relevance of giving such prominence to 2 Maccabees 4: 4-6 (above, p. 298). Onias was a priest in authority over a city, whose actions in seeking outside assistance from a king in order to put an end to internal political disruption are explicitly distinguished from betrayal.
2
Sermo 280 ( G. Salvadori and V. Federici, 'I Sermoni d'occasione, le sequenze e i ritmi di Remigio Girolami Fiorentino', Scritti Vari di Filologia a Ernesto Monaco; Rome, 1901), p. 484. Cf. Contra Falsos Ecclesie Professores 63, ed. F. Tamburini ( Rome, 1981), p. 189.
3
Sermo 35, pp. 486-7.

-316-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Common Good in Late Medieval Political Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 408

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.