Early American Modernist Painting, 1910-1935

By Abraham A. Davidson | Go to book overview

Preface

I began my study of the history of early American modernist painting in the late summer of 1961. At that time, as a graduate student in Columbia University's art history department, I was casting about for a dissertation topic; and when I was using the library of the Fogg Museum, the late Professor Benjamin Rowland helped me inestimably (as he had helped so many others) by suggesting that this field represented a lacuna in studies in the broader history of American painting, a lacuna, by the way, which has been growing smaller and smaller. In my dissertation, which I entitled (I would not use the same title today) "Some Early American Cubists, Futurists, and Surrealists: Their Paintings, Their Writings, Their Critics," I focused on certain aspects of the Stieglitz painters, Arthur G. Dove, Marsden Hartley, John Marin, Alfred Maurer, and Max Weber, and on Charles Demuth. Since its completion in 1965, I have kept up my interest in the field, and written some articles and reviews. Although I was born in 1935, the last year of this book's time span, the first third of this century has had a special appeal to me, perhaps because my grandfather and grandmother, and my mother settled in this country from Russia in 1923.

Through the years certain painters, relatives of the painters, dealers, collectors, and scholars have shared with me their knowledge and information. To all of them I am indebted. They include, among others, Myron Barnstone, Thomas Beckman, Milton W. Brown, John Castagno, Anne O'Neill Donohoe, William Dove, Mrs. Malcom Eisenberg, Emily Farnham, Donald Gallup, William I. Homer, Anne d'Harnoncourt, Douglas Hyland, Leon Kelly, John Marin, Jr., Elizabeth McCausland, Garnett McCoy, Georgia O'Keeffe, I. David Orr, Henry M. Reed, Dr. Ira Schamberg, Robert Schoelkopf, Beth Urdang, Burt Wasserman, Mrs. Max Weber, E. H. Weyhe, Ben Wolf, and Tessim Zorach.

I am also indebted to Temple University, which provided me with a research grant in 1979 that helped to defray costs of travel.

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Early American Modernist Painting, 1910-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Early American Modernist Painting 1910-1935 *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - The Stieglitz Group *
  • 2 - The Arensberg Circle *
  • 3 - Color Painters *
  • 4 - Some Early Exhibitions, Collectors, and Galleries *
  • 5 - Precisionism *
  • 6 - The Independents *
  • Epilogue *
  • Bibliography *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Index *
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