Early American Modernist Painting, 1910-1935

By Abraham A. Davidson | Go to book overview

6
The Independents

THE PHILADELPHIA SCHOOL 1

By definition, the so-called Philadelphia School painters were associated with the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts as students or teachers, spent much of their time painting in or about Philadelphia, and cannot easily be consigned to another grouping (hence the omission of Man Ray, who left Philadelphia before he was twenty, and then became intimately involved in the Arensberg Circle; and of Sheeler and Schamberg, discussed already in relation to the Arensberg Circle and the Precisionists, and the Arensberg Circle, the Synchromists, and the Precisionists, respectively.) The Pennsylvania Academy has long been regarded as the bastion of pedagogic conservatism. It was there that the young student Thomas Eakins from 1861 to 1866 was forced to draw endlessly from antique casts, never once being exposed to the live model. The place impressed students with its majestic stillness. 2 Yet from the 1890s, when the Academy was occupying its present location, the great Furness Building at Broad and Cherry streets, there served on the faculty men who were to be the most adventurous of America's painters. The Philadelphia School was characterized generally by a boldness in the use of color. It represented something of a complement to French Fauvism.

Arthur Beecher Carles, Jr. (1882-1952), studied at the Pennsylvania Academy from 1900 to 1907 under Cecelia Beaux and Thomas Anshutz, former pupils of Eakins, and William Merritt Chase, from whom he gained an appreciation of Impressionism and the textural quality of paint. Partly with the help of the Cresson Traveling Scholarship awarded to him by the Academy in eight quarterly installments of $250, Carles lived in Paris from 1907 to 1910 and in 1912. He visited the Steins; associated with Steichen, Marin, and Maurer, with whom in 1908 he formed the New Society of American Artists in Paris; and

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Early American Modernist Painting, 1910-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Early American Modernist Painting 1910-1935 *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - The Stieglitz Group *
  • 2 - The Arensberg Circle *
  • 3 - Color Painters *
  • 4 - Some Early Exhibitions, Collectors, and Galleries *
  • 5 - Precisionism *
  • 6 - The Independents *
  • Epilogue *
  • Bibliography *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Index *
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