The Life & Legend of E.H. Harriman

By Maury Klein | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The research and writing of this book owe much to people in many capacities who contributed freely of their time and energy. Although it would be impossible to name them all, the following individuals stand out for their efforts and cooperation. Donald D. Snoddy of the Union Pacific Museum was a rock on whom any researcher could lean for support. In this project, as in previous ones, he provided a full measure of help and good cheer. Ken Longe of the Union Pacific's public relations staff also responded to every request with alacrity. I am especially grateful to Jim Ady of Salt Lake City, who brought to my attention certain invaluable records of the Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad that he had personally saved from destruction.

William J. Rich III helped me gain access to the materials stored at Arden Farms, which turned out to be a mine of useful information. At Arden Farms, George Paffenbarger generously gave me complete access to the Kennan and other materials, office support, and useful advice. Frank Allston of IC Industries granted me access to the early minute books and records of the Illinois Central Railroad still in possession of IC Industries.

Librarians in several locations provided their expertise as well as access to key collections of papers. Foremost among them were Florence Lathrop of Baker Library at the Harvard Business School, W. Thomas White of the James J. Hill Reference Library in St. Paul, John Aubrey of the Newberry Library in Chicago, Mary Ann Jensen and Andy Thomson of the Firestone Library at Princeton University, Andrea Paul of the Nebraska State Museum and Archives, Bernard J. Crystal of the Butler Library at Columbia University, Richard Crawford of the National Archives, and Margaret N. Haines of the Oregon Historical Society.

The staff of my “home” library at the University of Rhode Island fielded my every request with their usual efficiency and helpfulness. In particular I wish to thank Marie Beaumont, Vicki Burnett, John Etchingham, Mimi Keefe, Sylvia C. Krausse, Kevin Logan, John Osterhout, and Marie Rudd. Several friends and colleagues were generous with their advice and support on various subjects. Their ranks include William D. Burt, Don L. Hofsommer, Priscilla Long, Albro Martin, Lloyd J. Mercer, and Glenn Porter. Frank A. Vanderlip Jr. helped me understand his banker father. I benefited, too, from interviews with Elbridge T. Gerry, W. Averell Harriman, and Robert A. Lovett in my earlier Union Pacific project.

-xi-

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The Life & Legend of E.H. Harriman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • The Life & Legend of E. H. Harriman *
  • Prologue - Mr. Kennan Writes a Biography 1
  • Part I - 1848–1898 *
  • 1 - Sources of Pride and Strength 27
  • 2 - Sources of Advancement 36
  • 3 - Sources of Growth 48
  • 4 - Sources of Education 61
  • 5 - Sources of Revelation 71
  • 6 - Sources of Opportunity 88
  • Part II - 1898–1900 *
  • 7 - Going West 105
  • 8 - Going for Broke 118
  • 9 - Going Modern 130
  • 10 - Going Back Together 148
  • 11 - Going Elsewhere 162
  • 12 - Going North 181
  • Part III - 1900–1904 *
  • 13 - Seeking Order 203
  • 14 - Seeking an Advantage 214
  • 15 - Seeking Trump 225
  • 16 - Seeking Hegemony 240
  • 17 - Seeking the Perfect Machine 254
  • 18 - Seeking the Perfect Organization 272
  • 19 - Seeking the World 283
  • 20 - Seeking Relief 292
  • Part IV - 1904–1909 *
  • 21 - Fighting the Tide 307
  • 22 - Fighting Formidable Foes 317
  • 23 - Fighting Others' Fights 329
  • 24 - Fighting a Former Friend 344
  • 25 - Fighting a Formidable Friend 356
  • 26 - Fighting Nature 372
  • 27 - Fighting for Survival 386
  • 28 - Fighting Back 403
  • 29 - Fighting the Inevitable 420
  • Epilogue - The Good That Men Do 443
  • Notes 449
  • Index 505
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